Regent Street.

 

Follow the link below for a ‘map’ of premises in the street.

Regent St map

Regent St. was  developed on the causeway which originally  extended west from the site of the  Mason’s Arms (on what became Victoria St), to serve the  Royal Clarence Hotel. The entrance to The Clarence was from this street (The coach entrance archway can still be seen) as there was then no vehicular access across the dunes from the seaward side. The passageway between the east end of the street and the Masons Arms was widened to become a northward extension of Alfred Street (High Street) when the Lifeboat Temperance Cafe was built.

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Royal Clarence Hotel showing gateposted  entrance to Regent St,  by this time connecting with the original North Esplanade

Below is a view of Ernest Tucker’s department store (drapery, millinery, grocery, wines & spirits, which extended around the corner into Alfred St (High St) during there early years of the 20th century. It was replaced by International Tea Co (International stores) around 1929.

John Tucker’s had previously been at an address further up the street. Advert below from Mate’s Guide 1903.

Woodmans reg st

Biddick

Advertisements above from Burnham on Sea Golf Handbook, probably 1910’s

The picture below is probably of the George V coronation celebration. The front of  what is either at this time Tucker’s Motors and Cycles or Rogers’ Motor Engineering is visible at left and beyond it the Burnham Institute.

Above advert from Burnham on Sea Guide, probably 1940’s

The upper floor of  building which appears in the picture below as the International Stores (subsequently the Job Centre, now vacant for many years) was once home to The Blue Bird Tea Rooms.  An article about a Rail excursion to Burnham, in the Western Gazette of 28th August 1931, says:

 ‘I lunched late at the “Blue Bird.” I mention this fact not because  suppose that my gastronomic cravings can in the smallest degree interest the reader, but because he ought to know that the “Blue Bird” exists. It is a delightful cafe, and one is served well. Besides the name is charming and appropriate. If Maeterlinck’s blue bird*can flourish anywhere, surely it can at Burnham.’      

(*The magical ‘Blue Bird of Happiness’  from a play by Maurice Maeterlinck)

Regent St

The picture above, possibly from the 1970’s, shows the International Supermarket and W.H. Smiths. If this is compared with the picture at the head of the page it can be seen that the building has been truncated (note upstairs windows), probably when Alfred St was extended.

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